First parachute jump
I went to Taupo, New Zealand, and this was my first parachute jump. Skydiving has never been something that I desperately wanted to do, or even miss such a fleeting…

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A GOOD PARASHUTISTER DOES NOT HINDER ANYTHING
Ground lunch is a relatively young sport. Although many people call starting from the slope “the invention of the bicycle”, we know for sure that this is not an invention,…

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After a parachute jump, it's easier to take on the little things in life.
Do you want to feel like a bird in free flight, but still can not cross that treasured line? So this article is for you! Alexander Tunikov will help us…

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Turning the brakes

For example, it was previously noted that the cornering angle of a dome can be changed using front free ends. As in the example with the sled, pulling up both front free ends when approaching in a straight line can be compared to descending from a steeper mountain. Vertical speed increases. Higher speeds should create greater lift. However, there is a danger of dragging the front free ends – this will lead to a deformation of the wing profile and a decrease in its effectiveness. In this case, you get the effect of “spoiled profile” – your actions led to the fact that a normally working wing stops working.A damaged wing profile, for example, is the cause of the dome’s behavior, which the pilot perceives as subsidence, or descending steep stairs. In some situations (and only for some domes!), This technique may be useful, for example, for an initial reduction to a small area, such as a clearing or stadium. When approaching the ground, however, the front free ends must be released in advance, because when they are pulled, the vertical speed is high and the lifting force is not very.

Another common mistake in working with front free ends is overly aggressive input and output. Air, which behaves like a liquid, as a rule, flows around objects placed into it, following their contour (“laminar flow”). An abrupt change in profile can lead to loss of laminarity. For a wing, this means a spasmodic reduction in the lift generated by it! Abrupt insertion of front free ends, followed by equally abrupt braking by control lines, is an inefficient way to create a “cushion” when landing, since both these actions violate the ability of the wing to create lift. The correct way to perform this maneuver is to smoothly tighten both front free ends (do not let the brakes go!), In which the descent trajectory gradually becomes steeper — until the maximum speed is reached without significant wing distortion. Then comes the gradual return of the front free ends, the dome slows down, and the pilot moves forward by inertia — the execution of the “cushion” is started even without entering the brake. To complete the maneuver, the pilot maintains a high angle of attack with work of the brake.

A landing approach with the introduction of front free ends is the next most difficult maneuver. As with entering a straight line, smooth input and output is important. The beginning can be quite abrupt, but in the second half a gradual reduction in effort at the front free end is necessary. With this performance, a sharp initial decline accelerates the dome, followed by an increase in lift as the steepness slope decreases. The transition from working with front free ends to working with brake should be almost imperceptible. A sharp release of the front free end, followed by an equally sharp brake input, is a sign of a poorly coordinated approach.

Acceleration with the help of front free ends has a number of important advantages compared with the turn of the brakes. Acceleration with the help of the front free ends accelerates the dome, and turning the brakes, on the contrary, inhibits it. This difference is especially evident at the end of the turn. After turning on the front, the dome slows to its normal speed and tends to return to a neutral position above the pilot. After turning with brakes, the dome needs to restore its speed to normal, so the return of the pilot to the neutral position occurs with a significant delay. Reversal of the brakes can create a greater pendulum effect, since in it the dome slows down much faster than the pilot under it. On the contrary, when turning with the front free ends, the dome accelerates only slightly faster than the pilot. When turning the brakes, it takes time for the pilot to “swing” back to the neutral position, and the dome to accelerate again to a speed that provides controllability and maximum lift. Making a turn at the front free end can be stopped at any time without compromising manageability.

Turning the brakes can also be dangerous for loaded domes (specific load 1.4 and higher, depending on the type). With a sharp turn, the pilot can swing so much that when he returns to the dome, the overload may be too high for the dome. At the same time, the wing finds itself in a situation of stall failure and becomes completely uncontrollable. Braking with brakes may not help, moreover, it can lead to an even greater loss of lift. All that will help the “pillow” in a situation where you are parallel to the surface, will move the point of your collision with the ground.

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